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Regulatory impact statements

About the Ministry of Justice’s regulatory impact statements

All proposals to create, amend or repeal legislation or regulations that are submitted to Cabinet must be accompanied by a regulatory impact statement (RIS), unless an exemption applies. A RIS summarises:

  • the problem that needs to be addressed
  • the options for addressing the problem
  • the costs and benefits of each option
  • the people that have been consulted and their views
  • the proposals for implementation and review.

To help ensure that the regulatory process is open and transparent, RISs are published at the time the relevant bill is introduced to Parliament or the regulation is gazetted, or at the time of ministerial release.

Regulatory Impact Statement: Considering changing the New Zealand flag
This Regulatory Impact Statement (RIS) analyses the implications of regulatory options for a referendum process to consider changing the New Zealand national flag. October 2014.
Regulatory Impact Statement - Review of the Privacy Act 1993
Regulatory Impact Statement: Claim of Right
At the Minister of Justice’s request, the Ministry of Justice has undertaken a review of the law regarding the ‘claim of right’ defence, which was used successfully by the three accused in the Waihopai satellite damage case. November 2010.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Criminal Procedure Simplification
This RIS has been prepared by the Ministry of Justice. It provides analysis of options to reform and modernise criminal procedure developed by the Criminal Procedure (Simplification) Project. October 2010.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Fee for lodging appeals to the Immigration and Protection Tribunal
The Ministry is tasked with the setting of an appropriate fee for the lodging of appeals to the Immigration and Protection Tribunal (IPT). October 2010.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Crimes Act (Part 8: Offences Against the Person) 1961 Amendment Bill
The offences in Part 8 of the Crimes Act 1961 offences against the person) are affected by unnecessary duplication, archaic language, and lack of clarity as to scope and application.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Marine and Coastal Area (Takutai Moana) Bill
The Marine and Coastal Area (Takutai Moana) Bill was introduced to the House of Representatives on 6 September 2010. The Bill repeals the Foreshore and Seabed Act 2004.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Courts and Criminal Matters Bill
The Courts and Criminal Matters Bill is an omnibus Bill amending 20 statutes to enhance the courts’ powers and processes for the collection of fines and other monetary penalties, and civil debt.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Driver Licence Stop Order
Licence suspension aims to improve traffic fines and reparation collection by introducing licence suspension for people with overdue traffic fines and reparation. April 2010.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Alcohol Reform 2010
This RIS provides an analysis of regulatory interventions to lessen the harm associated with alcohol use in New Zealand. May 2010.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Coroners Amendment Bill (Stage 1)
This regulatory impact statement analyses options to improve the timeliness and efficiency of the coronial system. August 2014.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Coroners Amendment Bill (Stage 2)
This Regulatory Impact Statement analyses options for stage two of the reform of the Coroners Act 2006 to improve accountability, transparency and leadership in the coronial system, ensure the management of human tissue samples is more responsive to the needs of families and clarify the jurisdiction of coroners to investigate overseas deaths.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Coroners Amendment Bill (Stage 3)
This Regulatory Impact Statement analyses options for stage three of the reform of the Coroners Act 2006 to review the legislative restrictions on suicide reporting and clarify the jurisdiction of coroners to investigate deaths of members of the New Zealand Defence Force as a consequence of hostile action while on operational service.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Criminal Investigations (Bodily Samples) Amendment Bill
The Government’s Post-Election Action Plan states that legislation will be introduced to “require DNA testing for every person arrested for an imprisonable offence” - May 2009.
Regulatory Impact Statement: All of Government Response to Organised Crime
This Regulatory Impact Statement provides an analysis of proposals arising from the organised crime strategy - Strengthening New Zealand’s Resistance to Organised Crime: An all-of-Government Response - published in August 2011.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Tribunal Enhancements
This Regulatory Impact Statement (RIS) has been prepared by the Ministry of Justice. It provides an analysis of options to improve the efficiency of 29 Ministry of Justice administered tribunals.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Improvements to District Courts Rules
This Regulatory Impact Statement has been prepared by the Ministry of Justice. It provides an analysis of options to reduce the time and cost involved in resolving cases in the civil jurisdiction (non-criminal and non-family) of the District Courts.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Parliamentary Privilege Bill
This Regulatory Impact Statement analyses options for addressing some concerns about parliamentary privilege raised by Parliament’s Privileges Committee. October 2013.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Interest on money
The current law providing for payment of interest where there is late payment of money owing, is limited, not easily accessible, relies to some extent on judicial discretion, and fails to adequately compensate many creditors. A single, comprehensive and more widely applicable Interest on Money Claims Act is needed, with a basis for interest that reflects the commercial value of delay in payment of money owing. November 2013.
Regulatory Impact Statement: Enabling Service Transformation in Courts and Tribunals
This Regulatory Impact Statement provides an analysis of proposals to enable and govern the use of electronic technology in courts and tribunals. November 2013.