Publications

 
This Directory of Official Information is not the current version

This is an archived version.

To view the current version please visit Directory of Official Information - December 2013.

 

New Zealand Police

Nga Pirihimana O Aotearoa

RELEVANT ACTS

The Police operate under the Police Act 1958 and the Police Regulations 1992.

Police administers the following legislation:

  • Arms Act 1983
  • Crimes and Misconduct (Overseas Operations) Act 2004
  • Police Act 1958
  • United Nations (Police) Act 1964
  • Arms (Restricted Weapons and Specially Dangerous Airguns) Order 1984 SR 1984/122
  • Arms Amendment Regulations 1998 SR 1998/155
  • Arms Amendment Regulations 1998 SR 1998/466
  • Arms Regulations 1992 SR 1992/346
  • Land Transport (Blood Test Fee) Notice 2001 SR 2001/417
  • Land Transport (Certificates of Compliance for Evidential Breath-Testing Device (Alcosensor II)) Notice 2001 SR 2001/418
  • Land Transport (Certificates of Compliance for Evidential Breath-Testing Device (Dräger 7110)) Notice 2001 SR 2001/419
  • Land Transport (Certificates of Compliance for Evidential Breath-Testing Device (Intoxilyzer 5000)) Notice 2001 SR 2001/420
  • Land Transport (Certificates of Compliance for Evidential Breath-Testing Device (Seres)) Notice 2001 SR 2001/421
  • Police (United Nations) Regulations 1964 SR 1964/124
  • Police Amendment Act Commencement Order 1996 SR 1996/28
  • Police Regulations 1992 SR 1992/14
  • Queen's Police Medal Regulations 1959 SR 1959/191
  • Royal Warrant – The Queen's Police Medal SR 1959/190
  • The New Zealand Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal SR 1994/107
  • The New Zealand Traffic Service Medal SR 1994/108
  • Transport (Approved Vehicle Surveillance Equipment) Notice 1994 SR 1994/202
  • Transport (Breath Tests) Notice (No 2) 1989 SR 1989/389
  • Transport (Measurement of Weight) Notice 1997 SR 1997/375.

FUNCTIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The Commissioner of Police is appointed by the Governor-General under section 3 of the Police Act 1958 and is responsible for the general administration and control of the Police.

The Police Mission is "to be a world class Police service working in partnership with citizens and communities to prevent crime and road trauma, enhance public safety and maintain law and order". The wider intent of this mission statement is captured by the vision "Safer Communities Together".

The Police Values Statements are:

  • integrity;
  • professionalism;
  • respect; and
  • commitment to Maori and Treaty.

Strategic Goals

To realise the mission statement and provide strategic focus, Police develop a number of high level strategic goals and outcomes aimed at reducing crime and increasing public safety.

1. Community reassurance

Outcome: Confident, safe and secure communities

2. Policing with confidence

Outcome: Less actual crime and road trauma, fewer victims

3. Organisational development

Outcome: A world class Police service

STRUCTURE

Police National Headquarters

The functions performed at Police National Headquarters are spread between the Commissioner; a Deputy Commissioner Operations; and a Deputy Commissioner Resource Management. Other functions are performed by: Assistant Commissioner Strategy, Policy and Performance; Assistant Commissioner Crime and Operations; Assistant Commissioner International Services Group; and General Managers of Public Affairs; Human Resources and Organisational Development; Finance and Planning. The Commissioner is also supported by Executive and Ministerial Support.

The National Managers within Police National Headquarters, who are not service centre managers, cover the areas of Operations, Road Policing, Crime, Maori, Pacific and Ethnic Services, Organisational Performance, Professional Standards, Policing Development, Risk and Assurance, Youth Services, Business Planning, and Policy.

Auckland Metro Crime and Operations Support (Amcos)

Role

AMCOS is a unique grouping of specialist and support units within New Zealand Police, providing a wide range of services supporting operations and investigations across Metropolitan Auckland, and in some cases on a wider regional, national, or even international basis.

Structure

This section comprises sworn and non-sworn staff in the Auckland region.

Functions and responsibilities

AMCOS provide specialist functions in three main areas:

  • high level complex investigations and investigations support;
  • specialist intelligence management; and
  • specialised operational response.

AMCOS Operations Support includes the Air Support Unit, the Dog Section, Specialist Search Group, the Maritime Unit, Land and Sea Search and Rescue and Emergency Management. Operations support provides expert advice and specialist response to the three Auckland districts in dealing with high volume crime and associated response. The investigations and intelligence components of AMCOS deal with higher level organised crime in support of the three Auckland districts.

Records

Records held relate to the activities of AMCOS.

Communications Centres

Role

The Communications Centres are responsible for receiving and handling all 111 emergency calls to Police and general calls for service from the public. The Communications Centres also manage the dispatch of Police resources in response to these calls for service, as appropriate.

Structure

Sworn and non-sworn members staff Communications Centres.

Functions and responsibilities

Communications Centres are located in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch, and use the Communication and Resource Deployment (CARD) System to manage calls for service and deployment of Police resources.

Records

Records held relate to the activities of the Communications Centres.

Crime and Forensic Group

National Crime Service Centre

Role

The primary responsibilities of the National Crime Service Centre include:

  • the National Bureau Criminal Intelligence (NBCI) who provide a tactical and strategic intelligence services at a national level; the maintenance of national criminal intelligence on target groups and activities; the dissemination of intelligence to New Zealand Police and other agencies; the maintenance of a 24-hour tactical crime intelligence response; and the maintenance of suspicious transaction reporting and money laundering reporting.
  • the National Bureau Investigation Support (NBIS) who provide operational support through covert capability, including national coordination of undercover agents, witness protection programme, national cannabis crime operations, covert human intelligence source and centralised interception monitoring centre.
  • the Crime Policy, Projects and Planning group, which includes the Interpol Office, National Coordination of Adult Sexual Assault and Child Abuse, and Terrorist designations office.
  • national forensic coordination, including coordination of National Fingerprints, Scene of Crime officers (SOCO’s) and Crime Scene attenders (CSA’s), ESR liaison, and photography liaison and Document examination coordination.
  • national coordination: Electronic Crime Laboratories, who provide oversight to e-crime and forensic examination of e-crime contributors (i.e. computers and cell phones).

Structure

The Service centre comprises sworn and non-sworn members.

Functions and responsibilities

The Bureau's specific functions and responsibilities are separated into six main activities, in conjunction with its general tactical and strategic intelligence responsibilities.

1. NBCI

National Drug Intelligence Bureau (NDIB)

Functions and responsibilities

  • interagency liaison between NZ Customs Service, Ministry of Health and Police;
  • interagency liaison with New Zealand government agencies on drug matters;
  • international liaison with other agencies on drug matters;
  • management of drug searches pursuant to Misuse of Drugs Act 1975;
  • collection, collation, analysis and dissemination of drug intelligence nationally and internationally at a tactical and strategic level;
  • facilitate overseas drug enquiries; and
  • provision of statutory and other reports on drug intelligence.

Threat Assessment Unit (TAU)

Functions and responsibilities

  • collection, collation, analysis and dissemination of intelligence on potential threats – nationally and internationally;
  • analysis of threats to visiting government officials and preparation of assessments;
  • analysis of threats to New Zealand government officials and preparation of assessments;
  • analysis of threats to New Zealand politicians and preparation of assessments;
  • maintain Project Topaz for threats against investigative staff;
  • management of dossiers on activist groups and persons; and
  • respond to counter-terrorist threats or situations.

Organised Crime Unit (OCU)

Functions and responsibilities

  • collection, collation, analysis and dissemination of intelligence on organised criminal groups and enterprises nationally and internationally; maintenance of gang dossiers and information on individual gang members nationally;
  • co-ordination of Asian crime intelligence nationally;
  • maintenance of the national Police strategy to combat organised criminal activity;
  • management of dossiers on crime groups and persons;
  • maintain the various national organised crime projects; and
  • respond to counter-terrorist threats or situations.

Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU)

Functions and responsibilities

  • collection, collation, analysis and dissemination of intelligence on suspicious transaction reports and cross-border currency reports nationally;
  • establish and maintain procedures with financial institutions;
  • establish and maintain understandings for exchange of information with overseas financial intelligence units;
  • maintain financial intelligence dossiers and information nationally;
  • participate in the New Zealand Financial Action Task Force (FATF) Working Group;
  • gather information for statutory annual reports.

Modus Operandi

Functions and responsibilities

  • collection, collation, analysis and dissemination of intelligence on serious criminal offending nationally;
  • maintain statistics on homicides nationally;
  • maintain dossiers on serious offenders for homicide, serious sexual offending and armed robbery;
  • maintain micro-fiche dossiers on all New Zealand criminals based on offence and offender reports;
  • respond to requests for dossiers by Police districts.

Strategic Intelligence Unit

Functions and responsibilities

  • respond to requests by the Minister and the Commissioner for briefing material on criminal intelligence;
  • respond to activation of Government for a counter-terrorist threat;
  • provide intelligence coordination and liaison for Police regions and districts in investigations which have a national perspective or which affect more than one particular locality;
  • provide strategic and tactical intelligence assessments on criminal intelligence matters;
  • maintain liaison with overseas agencies to ensure the ready flow of information and intelligence;
  • maintain liaison with New Zealand agencies to ensure the ready flow of information and intelligence;
  • represent Police on various officials' committees; and
  • maintain a 24-hour response capability for intelligence-related matters and queries nationally and internationally.

2. NBIS

Ntional Bureau of Investigation Support (NBIS)

The primary role of the National Bureau of Investigation Support (NBIS) is to provide all Police with support in their investigation of crime. This is achieved through three distinct areas:

  • Interpol Office;
  • Special Programmes Office; and
  • General Investigation Support.

Interpol Office

Role

This office is responsible for international liaison on all matters relating to policing in New Zealand. The main focus is in giving the New Zealand Police an international face through which all police inquiries coming into or going out of New Zealand can be channeled.

Special Programmes Office

Role

This office is responsible for coordinating all Police activity relating to:

  • covert human resource policing;
  • witness protection;
  • informer management programme;
  • surveillance;
  • rewards;
  • national cannabis crime operations; and
  • other sundry specialist activities.

General Investigation Support

Role

Manages national coordination of areas including Missing Persons, and Adult and Child Sexual Abuse, and maintains a high level of liaison with both public and private sector agencies, in order to allow these agencies to better assist Police in their duties.

3. Crime, Policy, Projects and Planning

Role

Provide policy, planning and project support in relation to crime initiatives.

4. National Forensic Services

Fingerprints National Office

Role

The role of this Unit is to maintain a national database of fingerprints.

Functions and responsibilities

  • processing of prisoners' prints taken at the time of arrest including their entry into the Automated Fingerprint Identification System;
  • searching of new prisoners' prints against crime prints recovered from unsolved offences;
  • comparison of prints taken from repeat offenders to confirm prisoners' identities;
  • the training and assessment of district Fingerprint Section staff and SOCOs;
  • provision of policy advice on best practice, training and equipment; and
  • maintaining criminal records on the NIA Enterprise Systems.

Document Examination Unit

Role

This Unit's role is to provide a comprehensive range of forensic document examination and handwriting identification services to the NZ Police, Government Departments, Pacific Island nations, private investigators, legal firms and private individuals.

Functions and responsibilities

  • examination and comparison of handwritings and signatures to determine authenticity/source;
  • determining the sequence of entries, files and notes;
  • detecting fraudulent alterations or page substitutions;
  • determining the relative sequence and/or date on which certain entries were completed;
  • dating documents;
  • identifying counterfeits and false documents, including currency and identity documents;
  • determining the source of anonymous/threatening letters;
  • the restoration of erased, obscured, obliterated, and faded entries;
  • examination of typewritten and computer-generated documents in order to identify their source and/or earliest date of production;
  • computer-aided decipherment of typewriter ribbons and the linking of documents to a typewriter/ribbon;
  • non-destructive analysis/comparison of inks and papers;
  • chemical analysis of inks;
  • determining the source, date and likely generation of black and white and colour photocopied documents;
  • providing advice on forensic document examination to counsel and investigators; and
  • demonstration and expert testimony of findings in Court in criminal and civil proceedings in New Zealand and Pacific Island nations.

Armoury

Role

The role of this Unit is to maintain Police firearms and inspect firearms involved in crime.

Functions and responsibilities

This Unit's specific functions and responsibilities are to inspect and maintain a service for all Police firearms; to provide an inspection service for firearms involved in crimes and accidents; to provide reports on such inspections; and to give advice on matters involving the importation of firearms.

5. National E-Crime

The Electronic Crime Lab

Role

To provide a highly-specialised forensic service for Regions/Districts in the field of computer and electronic technology.

Functions and responsibilities

Criminals are increasingly making use of computers and electronic technology to record transactions/conversations and maintain records. This Unit provides a forensic service to access the equipment and obtain the information for evidential purposes.

6. Other

Technical Support Unit (TSU)

Role

The role of this Unit is to provide field staff with technical and special photographic support.

Functions and responsibilities

This Unit's specific functions and responsibilities are to provide technical and special photographic expertise and to maintain a communication network to assist field staff during special operations.

The Crime Monitoring Centre

Role

To provide covert electronic data and voice intercept surveillance functions in support of planned operations targeting serious and organised crime.

Functions and responsibilities

This unit provides support to Districts on a case by case basis providing voice and data intercept capability to gather evidence on serious criminal activity. The information gathered can be used both for intelligence gathering and evidential purposes.

Records

Records are held relating to activities outlined above (e.g. Records of fingerprints are maintained nationally on an Automated Fingerprint Identification System and in a manual fingerprint collection).

Executive and Ministerial Support

Executive and Ministerial Support is responsible for provision of efficient and effective support to the Commissioner of Police, the Minister of Police and the Police Executive. This includes the provision of impartial and comprehensive advice and support to the Commissioner and Minister(s) on any matters affecting policing.

Role

To maintain active interactions with operational commanders, ensuring the Commissioner of Police is fully briefed on all significant operational matters. To coordinate and finalise, on behalf of the Commissioner, the Police response to Ministerial and Commissioner's correspondence and Parliamentary questions, and the New Zealand Police responsibilities to various South Pacific and Australasian Police Commissioners' conferences.

Structure

The group comprises sworn and non-sworn members, including Staff Officers and a Ministerial Liaison Officer.

Functions and responsibilities

Executive and Ministerial Services is responsible for providing regular and timely advice on significant operational matters, information on emerging issues and trends, and monitoring key performance areas. Staff Officers assist with projects and administrative details to enable the Commissioner and Deputy Commissioners the freedom to interact with key stakeholders, communities and Police staff in the field.

Ministerial Services staff coordinate and finalise responses to Ministerial, Parliamentary questions, ministerials and Commissioner's and other correspondence, and overview procedures covering requests under the Official Information Act 1982.

Executive Support staff coordinate the New Zealand input into the Australasian Police Ministers' Council (APMC), the Australasian and South West Pacific Region Commissioners' Conference (ASPRCC), and the Secretariat for the South Pacific Chiefs of Police Conference.

Records

Records held relate to the activities held in the Group.

Finance and Planning

Finance

Role

The role of Finance is to provide Police with efficient accounting and financial management services to:

  • facilitate optimum use of Police resources in meeting its strategic goals; and
  • meet all legislative requirements for external reporting as required by the Public Finance Act 1989, Treasury instructions, the Police Act 1958 and Police Regulations 1992.

Structure

This section is made up of non-sworn staff.

Functions and responsibilities

The Section has the following specific functions and responsibilities:

  • Funding and Reporting Requirements:
    • main and supplementary estimates;
    • three-year forecasts;
    • monthly reporting to Treasury and the Minister of Police;
    • half-yearly and annual external reports; and
    • financial aspects of new and changed policy initiatives.
  • Financial Management:
    • maintenance of accounting and financial management systems consistent with sound accounting practice, finance and treasury regulations;
    • maintenance of internal controls to ensure the security and integrity of Police assets and operational capability; and
    • monitoring progress towards budgetary targets, and provision of financial reports and advice to all sectors of Police as required.
  • External Relationships:
    • Liaison with Treasury, Office of the Auditor General, and other departments.

Records

Records held comprise a series of policy manuals, finance circulars and working papers for periodic reports. Manuals used are Treasury instructions, FMIS manual, Accounting Policies Manual, Internal Contract Manual and New Zealand Society of Accountants Guidelines and Statements of Standard Accounting Practice.

Business Planning

Role

  • delivering key accountability documents including the Police Statement of Intent and Annual Report; and
  • delivering an annual business planning process which meets Government's and Police's fiscal and strategic requirements.

Structure

This section is made up of non-sworn staff.

Functions and responsibilities

  • Planning, co-coordinating and directing the planning process to facilitate the achievement of Police corporate goals.

Records

  • Working files relating to business planning and reporting

Human Resources and Organisational Development

Role

Develop national human resource strategies, policies and procedures and support professional standards across the organisation.

Structure

The group consists of sworn and non-sworn members.

Function and responsibilities

Strategic Human Resources

This group is responsible for developing national human resource strategies, policies and procedures on a range of issues, including:

  • health, safety and welfare;
  • EEO/diversity;
  • performance management;
  • employment relations;
  • appointments and transfers;
  • people and restructuring;
  • human resource planning and information;
  • recruitment and selection;
  • organisational development; and
  • leadership development.

Records

Records held relate to research and development, policy and employment casework files.

Human Resources Consultancy

Role

To provide specialised advice and services to Districts, Police National Headquarters, and Service Centres on staffing matters.

Structure

The centre comprises mainly non-sworn members.

Functions and responsibilities

  • recruiting;
  • welfare services;
  • psychological services; and
  • general HR management to the Office of the Commissioner and associated Service Centres, including coordination of nationally-advertised positions and the JE Leader job evaluation system:
    • remuneration and benefits;
    • human resource information systems;
    • honours and awards;
    • grievance and disputes management;
    • medical services; and
    • employment relations.

Records

Records held are:

  • sworn and non-sworn awards;
  • manuals on appointment processes and remuneration setting policies;
  • vacancy files;
  • review files;
  • general Instructions on sickness absence management, and trauma policy data base; and
  • personal files, leave records, pay slips and reports.

Information and Communications Technology Service Centre

Role

  • to maintain and enhance the information and communications technology (ICT) systems and capability that support business operations and policing strategies;
  • to deliver and service the ICT needs of Police users;
  • to upgrade and develop applications that meet Police business requirements;
  • to actively provide timely and expert advice on enhancements to improve business processing; and
  • to manage and deliver ICT projects successfully.

Structure

The service centre comprises non-sworn and sworn members and is split into nine groups – computing infrastructure, applications, enterprise operations, regional operations, technology and solutions, radio, enterprise architecture, systems management and business services.

Functions and responsibilitiy

To provide business and technical support; enhance and maintain infrastructure and applications; manage projects; and provide a customer service focus.

Records

Records maintained relate to activities outlined above.

International Service Group

Role

The four primary roles of the International Service Group are: furthering New Zealand's law enforcement interests internationally; supporting New Zealand's foreign policy objectives in the Pacific region and beyond; contributing to peace support and peacekeeping operations; and contributing to disaster and emergency response, security liaison and other international tasks as required.

Structure

This Group comprises sworn and non-sworn members in Police National Headquarters, Wellington, Liaison Officer at international postings, international deployments, international secondments and programmes and projects: Pacific Prevention of Domestic Violence Programme (PPDVP).

Functions and responsibilities

The Group's functions and responsibilities include:

  • formulating international strategy and policy for New Zealand Police;
  • planning, supporting and managing international New Zealand Police deployments;
  • managing the Overseas Police Liaison Officer network;
  • managing international secondments;
  • managing international capacity building programmes and projects; and
  • building and maintaining formal and informal relationships with foreign police services.

Records

Records are held within the Group relating to its activities as outlined above.

Legal

Role

The role of this Section is to provide legal advice on any matters involving the Police to the Minister, Commissioner and Police personnel. An overview of proposed legislation affecting the Police is maintained, and members appear as required before parliamentary committees and take part in official meetings considering legislative change. Appearances are made on behalf of the Police at various statutory tribunals, commissions of inquiry and occasionally at District Courts, the High Court, and in the Court of Appeal.

Structure

This Section comprises both sworn and non-sworn personnel who are qualified barristers and solicitors.

Functions and responsibilities

This Section's specific functions and responsibilities are to:

  • give advice relating to disputes or claims that may involve litigation or legal rights, and to ensure counsel are briefed as necessary;
  • consider Police appeals against court decisions and, in appropriate cases, seek the leave of the Solicitor-General to proceed;
  • seek leave of the Solicitor-General to prosecute when specifically required by statute, and to seek stays of proceedings when applicable;
  • advise frontline Police in order to assist them in the performance of their duties;
  • assist Police personnel by the provision of effective, timely, legal advice;
  • produce training material regularly in the form of case notes and explanations of legislation;
  • provide speakers to the Police College on specialised or technical subjects;
  • review draft contracts, memoranda of understanding or arrangement, policy circulars, General Instructions, and other documents;
  • formulate policy and provide advice relating to legal matters arising;
  • advise District Commanders in the exercise of delegated authority to approve prosecutions under the Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993;
  • advocate for Police views in dealings with departments of state, the media, etc;
  • review material including press releases and television programmes to minimise exposure to legal suit on publication; and
  • build a repository of institutional knowledge concerning Police and the law that may inform the direction and robustness of future Police initiatives.

Records

Records kept by the Section consist primarily of judgments and opinions of legal precedent value, mostly in the criminal law field. Legal information is held on a variety of matters including the Summary Offences Act 1981, Misuse of Drugs Act 1975, Films, Videos and Publications Classification Act 1993 and specimen charges in areas commonly dealt with by the Police.

Licensing and Vetting

Role

The role of this Unit is national coordination and administration of firearms control, Vetting and Validation activities, the Photographic Image Management System for prisoners and firearms license images and the notification rights for victims under the Victims Rights Act 2002.

Structure

This Unit comprises sworn and non-sworn members.

Functions and responsibilities

This Unit's functions and responsibilities are to:

  • coordinate the implementation of the Arms Act 1983 and Arms Regulations 1992;
  • monitor importation of firearms and issue permits to import for pistols, restricted weapons and military style semi automatic firearms; issue permits for certain categories of knives and bayonets under the provisions of the Customs Import Prohibition Order;
  • liaise with national organisations concerned with the sale, collection, use, possession and safety of firearms;
  • administer the release of information under the Privacy Act 1992;
  • provide vetting services for caregivers, licenses, visas and similar requirements on behalf of Government and other approved organisations;
  • maintain, validate and update criminal records held on the Police computer system;
  • provide an after-hours (24-hour) communication and callout service for Police National Headquarters, and administer the Victims Notification process as provided in Part 3 of the Victims Rights Act 2002.
  • provide for the capture, maintenance and availability of prisoner and firearms license images on the Photographic Image Management System (PIMS).

Records and manuals

Records and other information are maintained or are available relating to the major activities of the Unit.

Maori, Pacific and Ethnic Services

Role

The role of this group is:

  • to research, develop and assist the implementation of strategies and policy, which meet cultural imperatives and opportunity for the New Zealand Police;
  • to coordinate and manage, as it affects New Zealand Police, Government's Reducing Inequalities objectives;
  • to ensure New Zealand Police fulfils its bicultural and Treaty of Waitangi imperatives; and
  • to administer and manage New Zealand Police 'Responsiveness strategies' in respect of Maori and Pacific peoples.

Structure

General Manager Maori, Pacific and Ethnic Affairs is the officer in charge, assisted by a Strategic Maori Adviser, a Strategic Pacific Adviser, a Strategic Ethnic Adviser, and Maori and Pacific Project/Research officers. The GM is also supported by District Iwi Liaison and Pacific Liaison Officers.

Functions and responsibilities

The functions and responsibilities of this Group are:

  • providing strategic policy advice to the Commissioner and Police Executive on cultural issues concerning the Police service and the community;
  • coordinating and managing New Zealand Police activity responding to Government's Reducing Inequalities objectives;
  • liaising with agencies and people who have potential to contribute to the cultural development of the police service and the community;
  • managing implementation of the New Zealand Police Responsiveness to Maori and Pacific Peoples strategies; and
  • providing advice, guidance, and support to field staff in respect of cultural matters.

Records

Records comprise working files and reports including Responsiveness to Maori and Pacific Peoples' Strategy development papers, both historic and projected.

National Procurement Group

Role

The role of the National Procurement Group (NPG) is to identify opportunities for the robust and contestable implementation of Strategic National Contracts and their associated lifecycle management. These include the establishment and management of National Contracts supporting the provision and maintenance of over 3,000 Police vehicles.

The group also has responsibility for the establishment and maintenance of New Zealand Police Procurement Policy and facilitates the activities of the National Tenders Board which ensures probity and Procurement Policy compliance.

The NPG has established and manages National Contracts. It actively pursues opportunities for procurement innovation such as Syndicated Procurement and the effective use of electronic procurement processes which currently see almost 400,000 transactions conducted end-to-end electronically.

The NPG actively participates in cross-government initiatives for fostering knowledge and best-practice sharing.

Structure

The group consists of eight non-sworn staff.

Functions and responsibilities

The functions of the group are:

  • contestable procurement policy provision, analysing, implementing and lifecycle management of National Contracts;
  • National Contracts Register, National Tenders Board facilitation and administration of major tenders; and
  • Fleet replacement programme.

Records

Records relating to the functions of the group as outlined above.

National Property Office

Role

The role of the National Property Office is to ensure Police property management (including carrying out of improvements) is carried out effectively and efficiently.

Structure

This section comprises sworn and non-sworn staff.

Functions and responsibilities

The principal function of the section is the delivery of the Police property portfolio. This includes delivering the national property strategy, designing and implementing performance management regimes and managing national property-related contracts, including building compliance.

The section also manages new property capital expenditure such as the majority of new police stations and major refurbishments.

An overview of the Police rental portfolio is also a function of the group including negotiating complex leases and managing the national property legal contract.

Records

Records held include:

  • files for all leased properties and the vast majority of owned properties;
  • a series of new building files;
  • microfiche drawings; and
  • records on disposals and acquisitions of property.

Operations Group

Role

The role of this Group is to review policies and coordinate planning and research in areas of operational policy including Emergency Management, Search and Rescue, Specialists Units, VIP Tours, counter-terrorist planning, and Police firearms. The Group also provides support to districts in these areas.

Structure

This Group comprises sworn and non-sworn members in the following areas:

  • Security and Emergency Planning;
  • Emergency Management;
  • Operational Services;
  • Violence Reduction; and
  • Tactical Groups Service Centre.

Functions and responsibilities

Security and Emergency Planning

Role

The role of this Unit is to provide planning and security arrangements for special operations, to contribute to government's national and organisational security outcomes and to plan and coordinate training for counter-terrorist operations.

Functions and responsibilities

This Unit's specific functions and responsibilities are to ensure Police develop policies and practices and are effectively organised, equipped and trained to meet their responsibilities in respect of:

  • border security;
  • police information, site and personnel security;
  • counter-terrorist and other critical incident operations through the conduct of exercises and training; and
  • national security interagency cooperation and coordination.

Emergency Management

Role

The role of this Unit is to ensure Police members are equipped and trained for emergencies, including search and rescue.

Functions and responsibilities

This Unit's specific functions and responsibilities are to ensure Police are effectively organised, equipped and trained to meet their responsibilities in respect of:

  • national or civil defence emergency;
  • airport and shipping safety;
  • exotic animal diseases;
  • emergencies involving fire, explosives and pollution;
  • search and rescue;
  • disaster victim identification procedures; and
  • other emergencies.

Operational Services

Role

The role of this Unit is to provide planning and security arrangements for major operations and VIPs, to review General Duties Branch policies and procedures, and to provide research and evaluation of Police firearms, uniforms and related equipment.

Functions and responsibilities

This Unit's specific functions and responsibilities are to:

  • coordinate planning and security arrangements relating to official visits from overseas, and New Zealand VIPs such as the Prime Minister;
  • coordinate and plan major operations;
  • review General Duties Branch policies and procedures;
  • monitor procedures and contribute to the formulation of policy to identify operational needs for Police firearms and equipment and to ensure proper training and deployment practices are known and followed;
  • research new uniform and related equipment products; receive and process suggestions from district in this area; and
  • approve trials of new uniform and related equipment by district and receive reports; evaluate new uniform and related equipment, and provide a quality control service on uniforms received in store.

Violence Reduction

Role

The role of this Unit is to provide policy advice and procedures to Government, the Board of Commissioners and Police Districts in relation to the Police Outcome of reduced violence.

Functions and responsibilities

This Unit's specific functions and responsibilities are to ensure Police develop policies and practices and are effectively organised, equipped and trained to meet their responsibilities in respect of:

  • family violence reduction;
  • family safety teams;
  • public place disorder and violence; and
  • alcohol as the aggravator.

Tactical Groups Service Centre

Role

The role of this Unit is to provide staff trained in a number of tactical capabilities and able to respond to certain critical incidents at short notice.

Functions and responsibilities

This Unit's specific functions and responsibilities are to develop and coordinate tactics for specialist groups and to ensure Police have an immediate capability to respond to a range of high-risk tactical incidents particularly in the areas of:

  • offenders armed with firearms or other weapons who are a danger to themselves or other people;
  • illegal laboratories manufacturing methamphetamine;
  • underwater searching;
  • close personal protection of VIPs;
  • improvised explosive devices; and
  • police information, site and personnel security.

Records

Documents relating to operational policy development covered by the above areas.

Organisational Assurance

Role

Organisational Assurance provide assurance services that involve evaluation, undertaking independent assessments of systems within Police (to ensure compliance with statutory and contractual obligations), testing and validating the quality of the systems, overseeing the Police risk management and the Project Management Office (PMO).

Structure

The group comprises centrally-based sworn and non-sworn members and reports directly to the Commissioner of Police.

Functions and responsibilities

The overall goal of the Organisational Assurance is to integrate assurance information from functions such as evaluation, assurance and risk so the organisation knows it is:

  • on track and performing well;
  • identifying and using opportunities;
  • earning and improving; and
  • keeping safe by managing risks in business as usual and around innovation; and in good health (i.e. culture and capability supports delivery now and into the future).

Organisational Assurance is responsible for:

  • assurance – keeping the Commissioner and Police Executive informed about the effectiveness and efficiency of Police work. Ultimately this assurance should assist the Commissioner to build and maintain ministerial, parliamentary and public confidence and trust in Police over the medium to long term;
  • evaluation – communication of evaluation findings and building an effective evaluation network within Police to enhance evaluative activities;
  • risk management – maintain the risk management approach which takes an organisation wide, big picture view of risk and considers strategic and operational risks related to service delivery, capability and change. It includes a Risk Implementation Plan to 2010; and
  • PMO – tracking progress of key projects.

Organisational Assurance activities allow the Commissioner to know whether he can confidently assure the Minister, Parliament and others that New Zealand Police:

  • achieving its strategic objectives;
  • identifying factors that pose risk to the effective and efficient conduct of its operations and managing risks appropriately;
  • receiving high quality information to learn from operational experiences;
  • complying with operational requirements and standards whether they are set by others or internally; and
  • developing capability to meet immediate and future requirements.

Records

Records maintained relate to the activities outlined above.

Organisational Performance Group

Role

The Organisational Performance Group, which is located in Police National Headquarters, is responsible for providing the Commissioner of Police with a resource to assist in managing performance of Districts and Service Centres, and for developing and reviewing a performance framework.

Structure

The Group consists of three units:

  • Statistics;
  • Performance Monitoring; and
  • Quality Improvement.

Staffing consists of both sworn and non-sworn staff.

Functions and responsibilities

Key functions of the group include:

  • providing predictive analysis for the Police Executive around Police performance;
  • identifying performance improvement opportunities for Police and influencing change;
  • production of statistical information;
  • leading the development of New Zealand Police statistical capability;
  • undertaking performance reviews of police districts and service centres;
  • monitoring organisational performance for the Police Executive; and
  • development and implementation of quality tools and techniques.

Records

The records of the Unit include:

  • working files and reports on quantitative and other performance issues; and
  • series of incident and offence statistics.

Police Prosecution Service

Role

The Police Prosecution Service (PPS) is responsible for all prosecution decisions once a case is before the court.

Structure

All PPS staff report to the National Prosecutions Manager who is based in Police National Headquarters in Wellington.

Functions and responsibilities

The PPS:

  • undertakes all police criminal and traffic prosecutions in the summary jurisdiction of the District Court;
  • prosecutes most preliminary hearings in the District Court (but not District Court jury trials subsequent to committal);
  • prosecutes defended hearings and preliminary hearings in the Youth Court;
  • provides case by case advocacy services in support of district responsibilities at coronial inquests (for instance, where the matter is difficult or complex);
  • provides case by case advocacy services in support of district responsibilities at miscellaneous hearings (such as Arms Act appeals, liquor licensing, appeals against impounding of vehicles); and
  • administers the Police Adult Diversion Scheme.

Records

Records maintained relate to activities outlined above.

Policing Development Group

Role

The role of the Group is to design and implement development strategies for the New Zealand Police.

Structure

The group consists of sworn and non-sworn members.

Functions and responsibilities

  • developing strategies to improve policing;
  • initiating improvement projects;
  • supporting change initiatives; and
  • providing support to the Commissioner and Police Executive.

Records

Records relate to the development and implementation of strategies.

Policy Group

Role

The role of the Group is:

  • developing Police organisational and sector policy and providing analysis and policy advice and management; and
  • developing and maintaining clear guidelines and instructions for operational practice.

Structure

The group is made up of sworn and non-sworn members and consists of two principal advisers, a strategy adviser and four policy teams under the National Manager: Policy:

  • Community Team;
  • Family Team;
  • Global Team; and
  • Corporate Instruments Team.

Functions and responsibilities

  • providing policy advice to the Minister of Police and Police Executive;
  • liaising with Government Departments and other outside agencies on matters where there are Police policy implications;
  • developing and updating the New Zealand Police Environment Scan; and
  • reviewing, developing, aligning, e-publication and managing all Police corporate instruments.

Records

Records relate to:

  • working and historic files relating to policy projects and management issues; and
  • archived and current versions of Police corporate instruments, including General Instructions, Commissioner's circulars, operational policies and guidelines.

Privacy Office

Role

The Police Privacy Office is part of Legal Services located at Police National Headquarters. The office has national responsibility for ensuring Police compliance with the Privacy Act 1993.

The Office provides quality legal advice to the Police National Headquarters/District Managers and members of Police on legal developments, legislation and other legal issues relating to the Privacy Act and Official Information Act within a Quality Customer Service framework.

Structure

The structure comprises a Senior Legal Advisor, Legal Advisers and an Advisory Officer.

Functions and responsibilities

  • Processing information requests;
  • Providing timely direction and advice to Police on privacy and official information issues;
  • Identifying legal risks and plans for appropriate actions;
  • Managing complaints made to the Privacy Commissioner and Office of the Ombudsman about Police;
  • Responsibility for managing proceedings brought against the Commissioner of Police in the Human Rights Review Tribunal;
  • Establishment and maintenance of information sharing arrangements with public sector and non-government agencies; and
  • Supporting the National Manager: Legal Services in the development of legislative change.

Records

Records maintained relate to activities outlined above.

Professional Standards

Role

The primary role of Professional Standards is to act directly on behalf of the Commissioner to guard the reputation of the New Zealand Police by:

  • directing the internal disciplinary processes of the Police;
  • directing the processes by which complaints against the Police are addressed and finalised, and ensuring the Commissioner's obligations to the Police Complaints Authority under the Police Complaints Authority Act 1988 (from 29 November 2007: Independent Police Conduct Authority Act 2007) are met; and
  • Monitoring and directing the process by which internal investigations into allegations of Police misconduct are managed and resolved.

Structure

This group comprises a National Manager, Manager: Investigations and Review, and reviewing and investigating officers and non-sworn clerical members.

Functions and responsibilities

This Section's specific functions and responsibilities are to:

  • review all completed internal investigations of complaints against Police;
  • ensure all internal investigations are conducted in accordance with established quality standards;
  • report on behalf of the Commissioner to the Police Complaints Authority new complaints against Police pursuant to section 15 of the Police Complaints Authority Act 1988, incidents of death or serious bodily harm caused by a member of Police in the execution of that member's duty, as well as internal reporting pursuant to the Memorandum of Understanding between the Commissioner and the Police Complaints Authority;
  • report on behalf of the Commissioner to the Police Complaints Authority on the findings of the internal investigation on complaints against Police and, if appropriate, what action has been taken or is proposed to be taken to rectify the matter;
  • monitor criminal and disciplinary proceedings against members of the Police;
  • recommend policy and procedural changes in order to minimise complaints against the Police;
  • assist in staff training and development so as to combat complaint areas;
  • liaise with District Commanders on internal investigations;
  • attend personally on the direction of the Commissioner to any aspect of an investigation in a district or Service Centre;
  • maintain adequate records of complaints and provide statistical data as required;
  • analyse complaints received with a view to identifying patterns of misconduct and recommending appropriate action;
  • arrange for the appointment of a Tribunal to hear disciplinary charges;
  • recommend policy and procedural changes in Police discipline;
  • liaise with the Police Chief Legal Adviser and the Crown Law Office on legal issues relating to both discipline and complaints; and
  • advise the Commissioner, Police Executive and District Commanders on disciplinary matters.

Records

Records held relate to the activities of the Section as outlined above.

Public Affairs

Role

To manage corporate communications for the New Zealand Police. The group provides specialist internal, external and media relations services for the Police and more specifically the Commissioner and Police National Headquarters.

Structure

The group is managed by the General Manager: Public Affairs, reporting to the Commissioner. It is split into three sections: strategic communications, brand and media, and editorial and publishing.

Functions and responsibilities

  • to plan and implement internal, external communications strategies and media strategies to support policing initiatives;
  • to provide communications advisory services to all Police staff;
  • to provide a media information service on Police matters;
  • to initiate publicity through media releases, media conferences and interviews;
  • to provide a media advisory service for Police National Headquarters, district personnel and high profile operational events;
  • to help train Police staff in media awareness and issues management skills;
  • to liaise with broadcasters and production houses on Police-related programming to ensure Police are portrayed accurately and objectively;
  • to promote understanding and acceptance of Police policy and strategic direction through developing effective internal communication opportunities;
  • to manage, publish and produce a national magazine as an internal communications vehicle for all staff;
  • to develop and promote road safety initiatives aimed at reducing the road toll;
  • to liaise with other Government departments and key external stakeholders on matters relating to the criminal justice sector; and
  • to manage an effective intranet and internet service to Police staff and the public of New Zealand.

Records

Records held relate to public and media relations matters, historical information and publications on the Police. Files are maintained on all Police-related media issues, including speeches, media releases, media monitoring and answers to media queries.

Road Policing Support

Role

The group provides support to District Commanders who are responsible for operational delivery of traffic programmes. A major task is coordinating road policing activity with other key agencies including:

  • Land Transport New Zealand (LTNZ);
  • Ministry of Transport;
  • Transit New Zealand;
  • Accident Compensation and Rehabilitation Corporation;
  • Ministry of Justice;
  • Territorial Local Authority organizations;
  • Alcoholic Liquor Advisory Council; and
  • motoring and transport industry organisations.

The group makes a significant contribution to the development of road policing policy and new legislation. It produces regular reports on road safety performance and maintains regular contact with media organisations. This group is actively involved in managing projects to ensure road policing is intelligence driven. The group has an oversight on the Police Professional Driver Programme, Pursuits and Urgent Duty Driving, and other major projects.

Structure

The group consists of the following sections which report through the National Road Policing Manager to the Assistant Commissioner Crime Reduction and Public Safety:

  • Operations;
  • Strategic Implementation;
  • Police Calibration Services;
  • Commercial Vehicle Investigation Unit;
  • Police Infringement Bureau; and
  • Strategic Implementation.

Functions and responsibilities

  • ensuring legal and ethical standards are maintained in road policing;
  • providing support for training on enforcement techniques; including the application of road spikes;
  • evaluating and reporting on motor vehicles suitable for patrol activity;
  • preparing vehicle specifications for the Police fleet;
  • coordinating fleet purchasing policy and practice for the Police;
  • evaluating and reporting on electronic enforcement aids;
  • providing liaison with LTNZ on vehicle safety standards;
  • maintaining regular liaison with certification authorities in New Zealand and Australia through the Australasian Traffic Policing Forum;
  • maintaining regular liaison with international manufacturers of enforcement equipment;
  • maintaining regular liaison with motor vehicle industry representatives;
  • maintaining manuals for technical equipment; and
  • maintaining the National Pursuits Register.

Police Calibration Services

Functions and Responsibilities

This is a discrete unit reporting to the National Road Policing Manager which is responsible for calibration of all electronic enforcement equipment including truck weighing scales, speed cameras, lasers, and radars used by the Police.

Operations

Functions and responsibilities

  • national management of the Highway Patrol;
  • setting up and managing the road policing Intelligence Project;
  • setting up and running the driver standard project;
  • strategic planning and tactical advice;
  • road policing standard setting and monitoring;
  • assisting Districts with setting up and delivering traffic safety campaigns;
  • developing a campaign calendar each year as the principal driver of national advertising campaigns administered by the LTNZ;
  • researching specific road safety issues; examples of which are the recidivist drink driving and violent offending associated with motor vehicles (commonly called "road rage");
  • coordinating inter-district traffic-based activities; and
  • providing technical input to advertising programmes.

Commercial Vehicle Investigation Service Centre

Role, functions and responsibilities

This Service Centre is responsible for:

  • managing the operation of the Commercial Vehicle Investigation Unit throughout the country;
  • collecting and collating performance reports from the Unit;
  • providing specialist input to legislative reviews;
  • managing interaction with industry groups such as the Road Transport Forum and the Heavy Haulage Association;
  • researching and advising on resource allocation for weigh bridge operations;
  • providing liaison with Transit New Zealand on road damage and related issues;
  • providing liaison with LTNZ on road user charges enforcement and evasion; and
  • representing Police at national and international conferences on commercial transport.

Police Infringement Bureau/Traffic Camera Office (PIB)

Role

The PIB is a centralised processing facility for traffic tickets, providing a document management, infringement fee payment and customer service facility on behalf of Police districts. The PIB receives and records all tickets using scanning and imaging technology. Explanations received from the public are considered and decisions communicated. When a Court hearing is required, the PIB creates the court file for delivery to the O/C: Prosecutions in the District, who is responsible for management of the case. The PIB also manages liquor licensing infringements and the Roadwatch complaint system.

Functions and responsibilities

The specific functions and responsibilities of the Police Infringement Bureau (PIB) are:

  • processing film from speed cameras;
  • ensuring legal and ethical standards are maintained in the traffic camera programme;
  • maintaining manuals and standards related to traffic camera operations;
  • supervising maintenance of capital equipment in the traffic camera programme;
  • managing external contracts for out-sourced services;
  • entering data from non-speed camera traffic tickets;
  • maintaining an 0800 customer service facility;
  • considering explanations received from the public;
  • communicating decisions on traffic matters to the public;
  • preparing Court files when hearings are required;
  • reporting, at a detailed level, on speed camera operations; and
  • maintaining an out-sourced facility for payment of infringements.

Records

Records maintained relate to activities outlined above.

Training Service Centre

Role

The Training Service Centre (TSC) provides: initial training to sworn police recruits, access to promotional development opportunities, specialist training, and district training, and works in partnership with tertiary providers to meet New Zealand Police business and operational needs and to enhance individuals’ performance and ongoing career development.

Most national training is delivered at the Royal New Zealand Police College, although some training is delivered in districts or through distance learning.

Structure

The TSC focuses on five key areas to ensure that training continues to build and develop the capability required to meet the changing needs of the New Zealand Police and the expectations of New Zealand’s communities:

  • initial training – developing new constables to meet district operational need;
  • promotional/specialised training – developing identified police staff for leadership and specialist roles;
  • cyclic mandated training – providing training for recertification, refresher and ongoing currency purposes;
  • annual mandated training – providing training when core organisational knowledge and skill need to be developed or refreshed in policy, legislation, procedure or IT applications; and
  • district training – providing specific training, mandated or discretionary, delivered at the local level (determined through a training needs analysis process).

Other services provided by the TSC include:

  • the New Zealand Police Library – provides corporate information and library services to Police to support policing activities;
  • the National Video Unit – produces training video material and processes forensic video footage; and
  • the National Police Museum – maintains historical records and artifacts of policing and provides a public museum service.

Information records

The following information records are held at the TSC:

  • all national course curriculum, course outlines and materials, programme details, evaluations;
  • training strategy documents, proposed new training developments;
  • archival and current Police video footage;
  • archival and current books and periodicals relating to policing; and
  • historical data and artifacts from policing.

Youth Services Group

1. Youth Aid

Role

The role of this Unit is to coordinate Police activity relating to children and young persons who offend or are in need of care and protection.

Structure

This Unit comprises one sworn inspector with the addition in 2007/2008 of a sworn Sergeant or Senior Sergeant.

Functions and responsibilities

This Unit's specific functions and responsibilities are to:

  • liaise with agencies and organisations concerned with the welfare and rehabilitation of children and young persons who have come to the notice of Youth Justice and Care Protection Co-coordinators appointed under the Act;
  • develop and coordinate youth partnership initiatives; and
  • provide specialist advice to districts on youth aid matters.

Records

Records held within the Unit relate to its activities as outlined above.

2. Youth Education Service

Role

The role of the Youth Education Service (YES) is to provide teaching programmes and trained Police Education Officers to schools to educate students about:

  • road safety;
  • violence prevention;
  • crime prevention and social responsibility; and
  • drug education.

Structure

This Unit comprises four non-sworn members.

Functions and responsibilitiesThe Police Youth Education Service works with young people, families, teachers and school communities to promote individual safety, leading to safer communities. The Unit's specific functions and responsibilities are to encourage and help schools in providing children and young persons with education programmes that lead to a reduction in the level to which children and young persons are perpetrators or victims of road crashes or crime. Programmes support the four strategic themes of the Youth Education Service and integrate with appropriate sections of the New Zealand Curriculum.

Records

Records held relate to the outputs of Police Education Officers and the themes taught in individual schools. A significant database of independent evaluations has been established.

3. Youth Development Programmes

Role

The role of the National Coordinator: Youth Development Programmes is to support and coordinate the district Youth at Risk programmes.

Structure

This unit comprises one member.

Functions and responsibilities

The principal function of the National Coordinator: Youth Development Programmes is to provide national coordination and support for the Youth at Risk Programmes within districts. This includes the delivery of a Youth Development Strategy, developing strategic approaches and policies, the coordination of national sponsorship for the Youth at Risk programmes and the development of a Youth Offending Risk Screening Tool (YORST).

Records

Records held by the unit include:

  • evaluation database and manual;
  • detailed evaluation reports; and
  • presentation packages.

DOCUMENTS RELATING TO DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES

Best Practice Manuals

  • Vol 1 Major Operations;
  • Vol 2 Investigation Support;
  • Vol 3 Investigations;
  • Vol 4 Traffic; and
  • Vol 5 Human Resources.

Policy and Procedure

  • General Instructions;
  • Memoranda of Understanding; and
  • Policy Pointers and other Commissioner's Circulars.

CONTACTS

Police National Headquarters

180 Molesworth Street
PO Box 3017
WELLINGTON
Phone: (04) 474 9499
Fax: (04) 498 7400

Licensing and Vetting Service Centre

Officer in Charge
180 Molesworth Street
PO Box 3017
WELLINGTON
Phone: (04) 474 9499
Fax: (04) 499 1065

Commercial Vehicle Investigation

Service Centre
Officer in Charge
180 Molesworth Street
PO Box 3017
WELLINGTON
Phone: (04) 474 9499
Fax: (04) 498 7404

Police Infringement Bureau/Traffic

Camera Office
275-283 Upper Cuba Street
PO Box 9147
Te Aro
WELLINGTON
Phone: (04) 381 0000 or 0800 105 777
Fax: (04) 801 8848 or 834 1903

Communications Centres

National Manager
National Management Group
Police National Headquarters
180 Molesworth Street
WELLINGTON
Phone: (04) 474 9499
Fax: (04) 460 2967

Information and Communications Technology Service Centre

Royal New Zealand Police College
Papakowhai Road
PO Box 50 040
PORIRUA
Phone: (04) 238 3479
Fax: (04) 237 2809

Royal New Zealand Police College

Director Training
Royal New Zealand Police College
Private Bag 50 906
PORIRUA
Phone: (04) 238 3000
Fax: (04) 237 1571

District Offices

Northland District HQ
Walton Plaza
3-5 Albert Street
Private Bag 9016
WHANGAREI
Phone: (09) 430 4500
Fax: (09) 430 8202

Waitemata District HQ

3rd Floor, Royal Sun Alliance Building
12-14 Northcroft Street
PO Box 331046
TAKAPUNA
Phone: (09) 8390600
Fax: (09) 488 9790

Auckland District HQ

Cnr Cook and Vincent Streets
Private Bag 92 002
AUCKLAND
Phone: (09) 302 6400
Fax: (09) 375 4650

Counties-Manukau District HQ

482 Great South Road
PO Box 22142
Otahuhu
Phone: (09) 295 0200
Fax: (09) 276 8156

Waikato District HQ

Bridge Street
PO Box 3078
HAMILTON
Phone: (07) 858 6200
Fax: (07) 834 9486

Bay of Plenty District HQ

1st Floor, 1215 Hinemoa Street
PO Box 741
ROTORUA
Phone: (07) 349 9554
Fax: (07) 834 4272

Eastern District HQ

Dalton House
Dalton Street
PO Box 245
NAPIER
Phone: (06) 831 0700
Fax: (06) 834 0339

Central District HQ

180 Cuba St
351-361 Church Street
Private Bag 11040
PALMERSTON NORTH
Phone: (06) 351 3600
Fax: (06) 350 3865

Wellington District HQ

Wellington Police Station
Cnr Victoria and Harris Streets
PO Box 693
WELLINGTON
Phone: (04) 381 2000
Fax: (04) 470 1600

Tasman District HQ

Munro State Building
Bridge Street
Private Bag 39
NELSON
Phone: (03) 546 3840
Fax: (03) 545 8962

Canterbury District HQ

Corner Hereford Street and Cambridge Terrace
PO Box 2109
CHRISTCHURCH
Phone: (03) 363 7400
Fax: (03) 3635619

Southern District HQ

25 Great King Street
Private Bag 1924
DUNEDIN
Phone: (03) 471 4800
Fax: (03) 479 9367