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30 April 2018

Addressing family and sexual violence essential to wellbeing – Under-Secretary Logie

On International Women’s Day, Jan Logie MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary to the Minister of Justice (Domestic and Sexual Violence) addressed a group of stakeholders(external link) in Auckland where she set out her vision and described the prevention of domestic and sexual violence as “one of our greatest opportunities for improving wellbeing and building a cohesive society.”

Jan Logie MP(external link) says her first few months as Under Secretary have been full of intense discussions about how to transform the family and sexual violence systems. “Whether I am meeting with Ministerial colleagues, government officials, advocates from the community sector, or victims of violence, every conversation is about the critical shifts we need for an integrated and effective system.

“As we finalise the priorities for the work programme for this term of Parliament, I am drawing on the knowledge of many and I’m pleased to hear some consistent messages coming through. People are talking with me about the importance of good law, enabling behaviour change so that people know what we need them to do, ensuring government agencies work together, investing in prevention, hearing victims’ voices, kaupapa Māori responses and adequate funding,” says the Under-Secretary.

If you wish to contact the Under-Secretary’s office, please email: jan.logie@parliament.govt.nz 

Ministry of Justice awarded SHINE DV Free Tick

The Ministry of Justice has been awarded the Shine DVFree Tick in recognition of its efforts to create a workplace that is safe and supportive for staff experiencing family violence.

Specialist Domestic Violence Agency Shine awards the Tick to employers. The Ministry is the first public sector organisation to receive the award and only the second to ever receive it in New Zealand, following Westpac in 2017.

 A Ministry Workplace Family Violence Policy was launched in November 2017 and a group of Family Violence Contact People within the Ministry was trained as first responders.  Anyone affected by family violence, whether they are a victim or perpetrator, can contact them for help and be connected to a specialist service as well as access policy provisions such as special leave and safety plans.

Pathways to help at the Ministry are clearly articulated and include managers who receive training on how to support their staff.  The two-hour training session is mandatory and will have been completed by all of the Ministry’s 470 managers by the end of May this year.

All other staff attend an introductory face-to-face session where specialist support is available.

An e-learning module and awareness raising activities support the programme.

The Ministry is an early adopter of changes in practice and behaviour recommended in the Family Violence Workforce Capability Framework. Receiving the award Chief Executive Andrew Bridgman called on other public sector organisations to follow its lead.

New Safe to talk helpline

A new national helpline called Safe to talk He pai ki te kōrero(external link) is now available 24/7 to provide free and confidential support to people affected by sexual harm. People can get advice and support from trained specialists and be connected to support services in their community.

It is the first time people affected by sexual harm have been able to seek help anonymously at any time from one central place. The helpline is available to anyone affected in any way by sexual harm – this includes those who have harmed someone else or have thoughts about causing harm.

Concerned friends, family and whānau can also seek information and advice.

Safe to talk is available for free 24 hours a day, seven days a week by:

Safe to talk has been set up as part of the Government's commitment to better support people affected by sexual harm and to prevent sexual harm by ensuring more people get the help they need at the right time.

It is being run by Homecare Medical who run a number of other helplines including Healthline and Quitline.

Integrated Safety Response (ISR) to Family Violence

The Multi-Agency Team (MAT), in partnership with the National Integrated Safety Response (ISR) team, is beginning the evaluation of phase two of the ISR pilots. This follows the first evaluation(external link) report released in August 2017. Findings of this report, after year one of the pilot, were promising – adult victims and children are better protected, perpetrators are better supported to stop their violent behaviour, and families and whānau are supported to live in non-violent homes.

Analysis of Police reports of family harm episodes found that two-thirds of ‘predominant aggressors’ had no further reported family harm episodes, or that subsequent episodes were less frequent and/or less serious than those in the six months before contact with ISR.  Recommendations for improvement to the pilots were also made. 

Despite these promising early results, more information is needed to inform decisions about next steps, hence the extension of the pilot for another two years.

The phase two evaluation will be the final evaluation of the ISR pilots in Christchurch and Waikato, and will help to inform ongoing advice to Ministers on the future of integrated and crisis response practice in New Zealand.

The objectives of this evaluation are to:

  • Understand the effectiveness of ISR compared to previous or existing crisis responses     
  • Determine whether ISR represents a good return on investment (costs/benefit analysis)
  • Understand the distinct features of ISR and the context required for ISR to work optimally
  • Examine the efficiency of the model (process evaluation)

 The evaluation will also look at the responsiveness of the ISR to whānau Māori and at the end of April we are commencing the design of the kaupapa Māori evaluation with a group of experts in whānau-centred evaluation.The final evaluation report will be delivered in June 2019 and insights and learnings will be shared publicly.

New Police approach to family harm

Police is gearing up to launch its new approach to family harm toward the end of May this year.

Acting Superintendent Bronwyn Marshall, Safer Whānau Business Change Manager, says the new approach is the biggest transformation of Police service delivery around family harm in more than a generation.

“Simply put, it’s all about new ways of thinking and working for many Police staff,” says Bronwyn.

“It involves new language, new mobile and desktop technology, new risk measures, and safety tools, all of which contribute to carrying out a quality family harm investigation at the scene - now known as a 5F.”

A training programme is underway for Police staff in the new approach and partner agencies and NGOs are being briefed ahead of go-live.

“This change presents a fantastic opportunity to prevent and reduce family harm,” says Bronwyn.

“Our training and the use of the new tools and resources on a day-to-day basis will really make a difference for the families we’re called to help, and provide better quality information for our partner agencies and NGOs to support families experiencing harm.”

The new approach is part of the wider Police Safer Whānau work programme(external link) which aims to reduce the harm families in New Zealand are experiencing, through transforming the Police response and partnering with iwi, community and other agencies to assist the most vulnerable and disadvantaged communities exposed to family harm.

To find out more about the Police Safer Whānau work programme, please email:  safer.whanau@police.govt.nz

Workforce Capability and Risk Assessment and Management Frameworks

The Multi-Agency Team (MAT) is leading the implementation of the Family Violence, Sexual Violence and Violence within Whānau Workforce Capability Framework(external link) and the Family Violence Risk Assessment and Management Framework(external link), released last year. These set out the skills, knowledge and actions needed to provide safe, effective, integrated responses to people affected by violence.

We’ve heard from a few ‘early adopters’ who are making use of the Frameworks to improve responses to whānau and families. We are gathering stories about how people are putting the Frameworks into practice so if you would like to tell us about what’s happening in your area, please get in touch.

In March, the Multi-Agency Team hosted a co-design workshop with some family violence network coordinators, community educators and good practice leaders, to get ideas on easy ways to get started with Workforce Capability Framework. Workshop participants came up with some great ideas for resources that would help promote the workforce capabilities and principles. Look out for some of those new resources coming soon!

Careerforce(external link), the Industry Training Organisation (ITO) for the social service and wellbeing sectors, is currently working with the MAT and a small group of family violence service providers to develop and test products to align the Framework to a workplace learning programme. The programme will contribute to the New Zealand Diploma in Health and Wellbeing (Applied) Level 5.

To create an engaging and dynamic approach, Careerforce is developing an interactive graphic of Kia Puawai, with Shayne Walker outlining the kaupapa and principles of the Framework and its domains. This will support people to get familiar with the Framework and how to apply it in their practice. Careerforce is aiming to have the programme available for the sector by the middle of 2018.

MAT is continuing conversations with local and national groups on using and improving the Frameworks. If you have feedback on these, please contact Sheryl Hann, Sheryl.Hann@justice.govt.nz

Integrated Safety Response (ISR) training 

ISR is a multi-agency pilot to ensure the immediate safety of victims and children, and to work with perpetrators to prevent further violence. The pilot is led by Police and is part of the Government’s broader Family Violence and Sexual Violence Work Programme.  ISR is operating in two sites – Christchurch area (Christchurch metro, North Canterbury and Selwyn) and the Waikato District and has funding to operate through to June 2019.

The new ISR training programme is due to be rolled out from early June 2018. The primary audience for the training are those working in government agencies, Non-Government Organisations, and ISR site staff (300 in the Waikato and Chch pilot areas).

The programme is a blended learning solution, which includes:

  • a series of five e-learning modules introducing the key concepts and knowledge on ISR eg. Introduction to ISR and Risk Assessment modules
  • a series of 7 one-hour workshops led by ISR site Specialist Practice Leads eg. ISR and our community and Leading Family Safety Plans
  • a Performance Support tool based around the ISR process, for learners to access key information ‘in moment of need’
  • coaching and support from experts and people leaders.

Once finalised, some of the training material will be available on the ISR website and may be of interest and use to other family violence practitioners.

Find out more about the ISR pilot and training(external link)

Implementation of new law

The Ministry of Justice(external link) is the lead agency for the implementation of the Family and Whānau Violence Legislation Bill(external link). While the timing for the passage of the Bill and its entry into force are subject to Parliamentary decisions, work is underway to enable new court processes and ways of working(external link) in anticipation of new law.

Simplifying and aligning Protection Order and Care of Children applications

In support of the changes in the Bill, the Ministry is working to simplify and align protection order application forms and Care of Children Act (COCA) forms. The need to simplify the forms was identified in public consultations on the family violence reforms.

The complexity of the current forms means it can be difficult for people to complete them and provide the information Judges need when considering an application.

Aligning the protection order and COCA forms recognises that people applying for protection orders may also have to complete forms seeking Family Court decisions about the care of their children. Ensuring some consistency in the look and feel of the forms will make it easier for customers. 

The design process is enabling input from victims of family violence, specialist service providers, Police, and the judiciary. Once new prototype forms are created, these will be tested with relevant audiences to ensure the best possible products.

For more information about the implementation of the new law, please email familyviolencelaw@justice.govt.nz

E Tū Whānau: Touch NZ creates whānau-first kaupapa

A commonsense way of managing conflict during Touch Rugby games has drawn high praise from players, supporters and officials who experienced kōrero AWHI in practice at the 2018 E Tū Whānau National Touch championships held in Auckland’s Pulman Park in March.

Inspired by values fundamental to the E Tū Whānau movement, Touch NZ Community Project Manager Moni Collins, developed the AWHI Side-line Behaviour Promise, a code of positive behaviour that Touch NZ expected everyone to adhere to throughout the tournament.

The result was a peaceful, fun-filled tournament and lots of kōrero about living with aroha and practicing tikanga – that which is tika, that which is right – in all aspects of life.

The power of kōrero awhi

One example of the AWHI Side-line Behaviour strategy in action involved a side-line marshall called Roger who had to confront a parent yelling aggressively at opposition players and the referee. He explained how consciously taking a kōrero awhi approach to the incident had a great outcome.

“I saw my job as trying to assist him in any way possible to stay and enjoy the game. If he’d continued to threaten players and the referees I’d have taken action, even called the police, but that would have been a last resort.

“Anyways, when I talked to him, he said that he didn’t even realise he was doing that. He was so sorry, and didn’t want to leave because he wanted to support his son, so we just thanked him for his kōrero. I invited him to enjoy the tournament and continue to uphold the mana of his team and their whānau, and that was it.”

“Everyone always gives us marshalls the evils, but now there’s this whānau word being used and that’s how we roll. Saying something like ‘Come on whānau, get behind the line’ sounds comfortable and makes things easier to deal with.”

Lucy Buchanan, a member of the Counties Manukau Open Women’s Touch Team and mother of a nine-year-old player, has also noticed the positive influence E Tū Whānau has had on the code. “

“There’s more enthusiasm, a change of attitude, and people aren’t afraid to stand up against violence anymore. Our etiquette has changed so much, especially in the words we say, and the words we choose, and that’s good for our kids. It’s the example we’re giving them.”

Riki Enosa from Counties Manukau and selector for the NZ Touch Trans-Tasman Squad 2018 rates the programme as a great success.

“E Tū Whānau and the AWHI promise have made excellent steps in the right direction by making all players accountable, and responsible, for their own actions.

“The AWHI campaign is showing us a way to be and how to act when we are representing both our code and our whānau. And there’s so much more compassion for referees and players as well.”

Rob Matthews, North Harbour board member sees great potential in the AWHI programme.

“It’s a document for all cultures and all creeds and has received the buy-in from all provincial teams. It’s a unifying document, it could be tweaked, but more importantly, it’s got the ball rolling.”

More information on the E Tū Whānau movement can be found on:

etuwhanau.org.nz(external link)

Joint procurement of programmes

The Ministry of Justice and the Department of Corrections have been working closely to align its contracts for family violence perpetrator non-violence programmes from 1 July 2018. A separate but aligned process is underway to procure MOJ safety programmes for adult and child victims of domestic violence. One of the main aims of this work is to offer providers more flexibility around programme delivery, so they can offer more responsive services in their communities. Both agencies require specialist framework programmes for Māori, and specific population groups including Pasifika, Asian/Indian/African/Middle Eastern and Chinese.

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13 February 2018

New Parliamentary Under Secretary to the Minister of Justice

(Domestic and Sexual Violence)

The Government has created the new position of Parliamentary Under Secretary focused on family and sexual violence. Jan Logie MP(external link) has been appointed to the role, bringing her extensive knowledge of the issues and the sector to her work. Under Secretary Logie has been a consistent advocate for those affected by family and sexual violence. She will lead the Government’s work on the design of an integrated and responsive family violence system, engagement with the sector, responses to the Law Commission report on justice responses to victims of sexual violence, and the implementation of new family violence law. If you wish to contact the Under Secretary’s office, please email: jan.logie@parliament.govt.nz 

New faces at the Multi-Agency Team for Family and Sexual Violence (MAT)

Sarah Holden is the newly appointed Director of the MAT for Family and Sexual Violence, replacing Rosemary Cook. Sarah has over 30 years of public policy experience in the UK and New Zealand, with senior management roles in a variety of government departments and agencies. She is passionate about social justice, having spent a childhood in Africa and a further 20 years at the UK Department for International Development designing solutions to reduce poverty. When at the New Zealand Ministry of Health, she sat on the Family Violence Taskforce, and has joined us at the MAT to complete what she considers to be “unfinished business”. When not working for government she runs a high-tech start-up.

Hannnah Cranston has taken up the role of Programme Manager of the MAT, replacing Bryan Smith. Hannah came to New Zealand from the UK in 2009, having been a Domestic Violence Coordinator for Avon & Somerset Police and a Northern Somerset Council. There, she managed the establishment of Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARACs) and a specialist domestic violence court. Here, her first job was as the National Services Manager for Women’s Refuge, and then the prevention coordinator for the Wellington Sexual Abuse Network (now the Sexual Abuse Prevention Network). Hannah is currently on secondment to the multi-agency team. Her substantive role is the manager for Sector Investment in the Ministry of Justice’s Sector Group, where she managed the social investment approach to justice programme. She lives in Lower Hutt with her beautiful but very naughty cat, Raj.

Evaluating the Integrated Safety Response (ISR)

The MAT is leading the final evaluation of the Integrated Safety Response pilots, which are operationally led by the NZ Police. The first evaluation(external link) was released in August 2017 by the Social Policy Evaluation Unit (SUPERU). While only a small number of people were interviewed for that evaluation, all of the victims that were interviewed reported feeling safer, with many noticing improvements in their overall wellbeing. Sixty-three per cent reported a complete stop to the abuse following ISR involvement.

The scope of the final evaluation is still under development, but is intended to build on our understanding of the outcomes achieved for people and families / whānau who have gone through the ISR process and associated services. This evaluation will be conducted in close partnership with the Police, Oranga Tamariki and providers working in the pilots.

The evaluation will inform future advice to Ministers about the next steps for the ISR. For more information or if you would like to be involved in the evaluation please contact hannah.cranston@justice.govt.nz

Implementing new law

The Ministry of Justice(external link) is the lead agency for the implementation of the Family and Whānau Violence Legislation Bill(external link). While the timing for the passage of the Bill and its entry into force are still to be confirmed, work is underway to enable new court processes and ways of working(external link) in anticipation of new law.

Here’s an update on a couple of the work streams.

Risk and needs assessment

The Bill provides for a risk and needs assessment service for perpetrators of violence. This service will be accessible for those subject to Police Safety Orders. We are taking the opportunity whilst designing this service to explore the potential for more referral pathways into this service from other parts of the family violence system, including self and whanau / community referrals.

A multi-disciplinary team from the family violence sector and Government, with expertise in risk assessment and service delivery is working collaboratively to design a prototype for future services. The goal is to create a risk and needs assessment service that is easily accessible, appropriate, and delivered specifically for perpetrators to take practical action to stop violence. In support of this work, the team will be engaging with perpetrators and victims of violence, including wider whānau and family.

Understanding the people who engage with Courts

This work stream is focused on ensuring the voices of the people who use Court services are a primary consideration in the implementation of legislative changes.

Customer voices are initially being sought on three specific issues:

  1. The safety of victims (including children) in family violence bail decisions,
  2. Simplifying the protection order application form, and
  3. Improving system responses to a protection order being issued.

Through face to face interviews, the Ministry is gaining an understanding of people’s experience of current processes. As the work progresses, new processes and forms will be tested so that we can ensure they meet the needs of customers. Community stakeholders will also have an opportunity to contribute their expertise and we’ll advise relevant organisations as the timing for this work is confirmed.

This people-centred approach will enable greater responsiveness to cultural perspectives and the needs of the more vulnerable members of our communities, especially children, those with disabilities, LGBTQI, and the elderly.

New resources for victims of sexual violence

Sexual harm helpline

The Ministry of Social Development is developing a new national sexual harm helpline called ‘Safe to talk’.

The helpline will provide, for the first time, nationwide 24/7 access to free, confidential information and support to anyone affected by sexual harm.

The helpline will go live on 19 February in the Canterbury region. This will provide an opportunity to test the new helpline and work with providers and users of sexual harm services to strengthen the referral pathways before ‘Safe to talk’ goes live nationally in April.

Navigating the justice system

The Ministry of Justice is developing new online guidance and information so that victims of sexual violence and their supporters can easily access information about what to expect in the court process.

The guide is intended to reduce the trauma and secondary victimisation associated with the judicial process, as recommended by the Law Commission’s 2015 report The Justice Response to Victims of Sexual Violence.

The Ministry is working with other government agencies, with organisations who work with victims, and with victims themselves to ensure the resource meets the needs of people who will use it. Victims’ voices will be included by way of quotes and links to other websites.

For information please contact: jane.tronson@justice.govt.nz

Two billboards inside Wairoa

Billboards featuring members of E Tū Wairoa, the home grown, whānau-first movement to rid Wairoa of violence, stand at either end of the town’s famous bridge.

E Tū Wairoa is a network of local whānau and community leaders committed to building a community that encourages and supports people from all backgrounds to live violence free lives. Members came together two and a half years ago, inspired by E Tū Whānau and supported by a small team at MSD, to encourage a collective stance against violence based on the unique cultural strengths of Te Ao Māori.

E Tū Wairoa is a great example of the way E Tū Whānau’s kaupapa is adopted, adapted, and used to influence and encourage positive change within communities. A marae-based tāne group is run by the participants themselves, with the support of Oranga Tamariki. Its success, is generating conversation around town, and is driven by the men deciding how they will work together to change their own attitudes and violent behaviours.

E Tū Wairoa has a similar group for wāhine. It holds community events and actively promotes the E Tū Whānau Charter of Commitment.  The Charter has scores of new signatories, and information on the kauapapa is currently on display at the Wairoa Council offices. Flags carrying E Tū Whānau values fly along Wairoa’s bridge.

They and the billboards, have encouraged conversations about the way individuals and their families can make positive changes, in ways big and small, that reverberate throughout their communities.

More information on the E Tū Whānau movement can be found on www.etuwhanau.org.nz(external link)

Justice & Corrections align contracting

As part of the cross-agency work to join up the family violence system, the Ministry of Justice and Department of Corrections are aligning their procurement and contracting processes for specialist perpetrator interventions (family violence programmes) and safety programmes for adults and children. Streamlining these contracts will help reduce providers’ compliance costs, allowing more time with the people who need support.

All contracted providers have now been offered contract extensions until 30 June 2018 to allow for procurement to take place, with new aligned contracts to begin on 1 July 2018.

In roadshows around the country in late 2017, providers were able to ask questions about what the alignment of contracts would entail. Alignment means service delivery, pricing, and contract administration will be consistent.

The joint MOJ and Corrections Request for Proposal was published on GETS on 23 January 2018 and is open for responses until 27 February 2018.

Progress in support of sexual harm services

The Ministry of Social Development is making progress to stabilise specialist sexual harm services to better support victims and prevent sexual harm.

The Ministry of Social Development has been working closely with providers in the sexual harm sector to develop:

  • Sexual harm crisis support services
  • Harmful sexual behaviour services for non-mandated adults
  • Services for male survivors of sexual abuse.

One of the important achievements over the past year has been the roll-out of three-year contracts to all 33 existing specialist sexual harm crisis support service providers.

These contracts, as well as the introduction of new service guidelines and reporting measures, are helping to stabilise the sector and build capacity and capability. Work is currently underway to fill the remaining geographical gaps in services.

Harmful sexual behaviour

A kaupapa Māori pilot aimed at addressing harmful sexual behaviour for non-mandated adults (adults not in the criminal justice system) started on 1 February in Te Atatu, Auckland.

The provider, Korowai Tumanako, will work holistically with Māori men who have engaged in harmful sexual behaviour and their whānau support network. The aim is to prevent sexual harm, increase safety, and restore and enhance the mana of whānau and communities.

Services for male survivors

Consultation has been underway with the male survivor sector to develop services to support male survivors of sexual abuse. Further work will continue this year.

Find out more about the Ministry of Social Development’s work programme(external link)

Workforce capability

The Multi-Agency team (MAT) is responsible for a cross-government work programme to reduce family and sexual Violence. An important element of its work is supporting organisations to build the capabilities of their staff to prevent, recognise and respond to family violence.

In collaboration with sector leaders, the MAT has already developed a Workforce Capability Framework(external link) and the Family Violence and Risk Assessment and Management  Framework(external link). In support of this work, the MAT is working with early adopters of the frameworks to develop guidelines for users. It is also developing proposals for ongoing support for organisations to build their capabilities, through:

  • Partnerships with organisations to enable the development of training materials, qualifications, practice guidelines, organisational policies and other ‘infrastructure’ necessary to build the capability of their workforces in support of an improved family violence system.
  • Support for platforms, resources, and networking initiatives to connect organisations and workers to share best practice approaches
  • Practical advice and support to organisations and FV networks for them to build organisational and workforce capability.     

One example of building workforce capability is the Ministry of Justice work to enable safe responses to staff and customers who may be affected by family violence and sexual violence. The Ministry has developed a workplace family violence policy and is implementing it through training for managers, information sessions for all employees, an online training module, and the appointment of family violence Contact People who will provide support to staff. The second stage of this work is focused on training and supporting frontline staff with their responses to customers who are affected by family or sexual violence.  

To make contact with the MAT please contact beth.anslow@justice.govt.nz

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16 June 2017

Research on family violence services starts next week

The multi-agency team has commissioned research to help improve understanding of the depth and breadth of family violence service needs. Research consultancy Allen + Clarke, supported by specialist researchers Devon Polaschek, Sue Carswell, Hector Kaiwai and Louise Dixon will examine the range of services needed by family and whānau affected by family violence, and identify and asses options for people to get timely access to this help and support.

Over the coming weeks, the research team will be interviewing providers from around the country, and across all types of services including both family violence specialist and general (such as mental health and AOD). They will also be speaking to victims and perpetrators who have been appropriately and ethically selected by providers. Naturally, the researchers can’t speak to everyone, but if you’d particularly like to take part, you are welcome to email us a few lines about the service you provide, where you are located, and who your clients are, and we will pass those on to the researchers. They can then make some additional selections, in keeping with the sampling methodology.

Summit survey closes today

So far 81 people have given their views on the topics discussed at last week’s Family Violence Summit 2017. The most frequently commented on topic has been ‘helping children and their whānau to live without family violence’ with 62 responses. The survey closes at midnight tonight. You can make a submission here. Analysing of the submissions will start next week, and once complete, we’ll share the results online and through this newsletter.

The outcomes from the Summit and the online survey will feed into the work of the Ministerial Group on Family Violence and Sexual Violence.

Watch Summit speakers online

Replays of speeches from Ministers, the chair and the keynote speakers are now available at www.justice.govt.nz/fv-summit(external link). Copies of Frameworks Minister Adams and Minister Tolley launched two frameworks at the Summit that were developed with the sector. The Workforce Capability Framework outlines the competencies, knowledge, skills and organisational structures that support the workforce to recognise and respond to family and sexual violence. The Risk Assessment and Management Framework outlines how to screen, assess and manage family violence risk, so that people get a consistent, effective response wherever they go for help. More practice guidance is also being developed. Both documents are available online for you to read, and begin thinking about how they fit with the services you provide. They are designed to assist and support you.

If you’d like copies sent to you, email us at familyandsexualviolence@justice.govt.nz.

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9 June 2017

Family Violence Summit concludes

This week’s Family Violence Summit, hosted by Justice Minister Amy Adams and Minister for Social Development and Children Anne Tolley, brought together 120 people from across the sector, and so far 56 people have also made an online contribution to the discussion.

Watch and comment

You can view replays of the talks given by Ministers, keynotes speakers and chair Sir Wira Gardiner from Monday next week. They will be online at www.justice.govt.nz/fv-summit(external link).

We are continuing to collect thoughts, ideas and suggestions from anyone with an interest in combating family violence until next Friday (June 16). Make a submission.

Frameworks launched

Minister Adams and Minister Tolley launched two frameworks on the day that were developed with the sector. The Workforce Capability Framework outlines the competencies, knowledge, skills and organisational support needed by the workforce to recognise and respond to family and sexual violence. It sets the benchmark expected of the workforce. The Risk Assessment and Management Framework outlines how to screen, assess and manage family violence risk, so that people get a consistent, effective response wherever they go for help.

We invite you to read and reflect on these documents. They are available online, and if you’d like a copy, email us at familyandsexualviolence@justice.govt.nz.

Over the next few months, the Risk Assessment and Management Framework will be tested by sector organisations, and at the same time supporting codes of practice, guidance and training will be developed. The Workforce Capability Framework is ready for everyone to test on the ground.

Summit outcomes

We’re collecting and analysing the views raised at the Summit and online, and once that’s done we’ll share them via this newsletter. In the meantime, here are a couple of thoughts from two of the day’s keynote speakers.

Senior Lecturer at Otago University’s Sociology, Gender and Social Work department, and Chair of the Social Workers Registration board Shayne Walker says there were “at times some fantastic korero”, but it’s got to be “beyond a talkfest”.

“Please have a good, in depth read of the Workforce Capability Framework. Chew it, swallow what you can and interpret it so you can use it now. I apologise if we have not included all of your dreams and aspirations within its pages, but as a framework it becomes transformative as everyone knows clearly what their job is and how to do it. In this sense we can respect each other more and work from an agreed set of principles, knowledge and actions.

“Once you have started using the frameworks, we need to create a new narrative about Family Violence 6 months out, 12 months out and 2 years out. Those who came to this event and all of those they work with require us to do this so we can have a different conversation in 3 years’ time.”

Sue Hobbs, who has worked in family violence prevention for over 30 years, and who developed the Safeguarding Adults Against Abuse (SAFA) integrated safety response, says the Summit was significant in that it raised the profile of older adults, disabled people, and adults with complex care and support needs.

“The invisible community is not recognised well in the system. It was good to be able to highlight before Ministers and participants the reality of adults who (in the same way as children) are often not able to remove themselves from risk of serious harm.”

A challenge for us all

As part of his personal reflection on the day, Shayne has thrown down a challenge he calls ‘Potential of the Present’ – an idea for a ground swell movement based on a simple, spreadable action.

“What if we all went home from the Summit to our families and whanau and called a family gathering / meal to clarify our own beliefs and actions regarding family violence. The agenda could be:

  • What is violence and is it ever acceptable?
  • What is a coercive relationship?
  • If we see it or are affected, who do we agree to talk to and what do we agree to do?
  • How can we spread this conversation into each of our wider circles of friends and acquaintances?

“With some simple maths, 10 people can become 1,000,000 people. We can create a movement of discussion, knowledge and action. Let’s ask ourselves as leaders in the field – am I prepared to have this conversation in my own family and whanau?”
Shayne says if you like the idea “or want to talk about a better one”, please get in touch at Shayne.walker@otago.ac.nz.

The outcomes from the Summit and the online survey will feed into the work of the Ministerial Group on Family Violence and Sexual Violence.

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May 2017

We want to hear from you

On June 7 a Family Violence Summit will be held in Wellington, bringing together people from across the sector to build on the conversation to date about breaking the patterns of family violence and working together effectively.

The Summit is being hosted by Justice Minister Amy Adams and Social Development Minister, Anne Tolley, and chaired by Sir Wira Gardiner.

Although not everyone could be invited, we very much want to gather views from as wide a cross-section of the sector as possible.

We’ve created a web page, on which there’s an online survey so you can comment on the Summit themes, or any other aspect of family violence, and can also watch live-streaming of the Ministerial and keynote addresses, and the Chair's summary from 8:20am to 10:00am and from 4:20pm to 4:50pm on June 7.

Visit the Family Violence Summit page to learn more about the Summit and give your views, and please feel free to share this link with your colleagues. The survey will remain open until Friday, June 16.

After the Summit, we will publish the key points and issues raised on the day, as well as those raised online. The results will feed into the work programme of the Ministerial Group on Family Violence and Sexual Violence.
 
The Summit themes are:

  • Helping children and their whānau to live without family violence
  • Kaupapa Māori whānau-centred approaches
  • Taking opportunities to intervene earlier
  • Supporting seniors, people with disabilities and migrant communities

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April 2017

Family Violence Summit

A national summit on family violence, hosted by Justice Minister Amy Adams and Social Development Minister, Anne Tolley, will take place in Wellington on June 7.

The Summit will bring together people from the sector to continue the conversation about how we work together and make change to break the pattern of family violence and reduce harm. Invitees will cover a broad cross-section of interests and views including NGOs, support workers, victims, former perpetrators and government agencies.

It supports the work already underway as part of the Government’s family violence reforms, which includes the introduction of the Family and Whānau Violence Legislation Bill to overhaul the Domestic Violence Act and strengthen family violence laws.

Although numbers are limited for this event, the Summit is one of many opportunities there will be to engage with the sector.

Any further questions, feel free to contact beth.anslow@justice.govt.nz.

New multi-agency team to drive Family Violence and Sexual Violence work programme

A new multi-agency team has been established to co-ordinate and drive the work programme of the Ministerial Group on Family Violence and Sexual Violence. The multi-agency team is made-up of officials drawn from the Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Social Development, Corrections and Police.

Bringing together the various agencies under one team reflects the need for a joined up and integrated response to family and sexual violence, by Crown agencies and across the sector. As the work programme has progressed we have found it increasingly important to ensure that all the connections between the work are being made at every level. The multi-agency team is an efficient and effective way to achieve that.

Government agencies will continue to deliver many major aspects of the work programme individually, whilst the overarching strategy will be co-ordinated through this team.

More information about the work programme

Any further questions, feel free to contact bryan.smith@justice.govt.nz.

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December 2016

In this update you’ll find:

Programme overview

The Government is committed to reducing family violence and sexual violence and keeping victims safe. A cross-government work programme is dedicated to addressing this challenge.

The programme focuses on preventing violence, reducing the harm it causes, better supporting victims, and holding perpetrators to account and helping them change their behaviour. It brings together a wide range of government agencies including the ministries of Social Development, Justice, Health and Education, NZ Police, ACC and Department of Corrections, among others. The programme is overseen by a ministerial group, co-chaired by the ministers of Justice and Social Development – that’s why these efforts are officially referred to as the Ministerial Work Programme on Family Violence and Sexual Violence.

We’re aiming to create an effective, integrated system by working closely together with government agencies, NGOs, service providers, community providers and people who need support from the system.

We know people and organisations across the family and sexual violence sector are working hard – especially at this time of year – and are committed to addressing violence. We’ll continue to seek their input and draw on their expertise so we can collectively develop a system that works well and makes a difference.

For more information about the programme, go to:

Family violence and sexual violence work programme

Risk Assessment and Management Framework

The Risk Assessment and Management Framework (RAMF) is a project led by the Ministry of Justice. The RAMF will support a shared understanding of family violence and its dynamics and help establish a consistent and integrated approach by agencies and services to screening, risk assessment and risk management.

Consultation feedback and next steps

During the consultation in August and September, we received substantial and really useful feedback from a wide range of family violence stakeholders. We’re very grateful for their insights on how to strengthen the framework.

There was overwhelming support for what the RAMF is trying to achieve and there’s clearly a need for it. However, based on the feedback, we also have a lot of work to do to develop a RAMF that’s fit for purpose. With this in mind, we’ll develop and implement the RAMF in 2 phases.

In phase 1, the original draft RAMF is being comprehensively reworked. It will now provide an overarching framework containing principles and expectations for organisations and individuals that work with people affected by family violence. It will include a whānau-centered kaupapa Māori approach, strong recognition of children, and practices for responding to diverse population groups (for example, different ethnic communities, refugees, LGBTI peoples). We’ll continue to refine the overarching framework into 2017, to allow more sector engagement and to ensure it aligns with other work that’s going on, especially the Workforce Capability Framework being led by the Ministry of Social Development (see below).

In phase 2, we’ll develop sector-specific practice guidance, risk assessment tools and training material. From early 2017, we’ll work with ‘early adopters’ to develop this content.  This will help ensure everyone adopts a common and widely accepted approach, with guidance and tools tailored to specific sectors. This process will also respond to consultation feedback which highlighted a need to work more collaboratively, sector-by-sector and with Māori to develop practice guidance for the RAMF. As with phase 1, we’ll closely cooperate with the Family Violence Workforce Development Project.

We’ll work on both phases concurrently, although the latter work will run for longer. How and when the RAMF will be rolled out more widely hasn’t been decided yet, but this will be informed by our ongoing work with the sector.

For more information on the feedback we received, including a summary of submissions and the consultation workshop summary report, see:

Risk assessment and management framework consultation(external link)

Workforce Capability Framework

The draft 'Family Violence, Sexual Violence and Violence within Whānau Workforce Capability Framework' sets a vision for excellence in the family violence and sexual violence workforce.

Co-designed by a sector-led Expert Design Group, the draft framework identifies the knowledge, skills and behaviours needed for a safe and competent family violence and sexual violence workforce. It covers all people, organisations and communities that work with family and sexual violence in New Zealand.

The framework poses questions through its 6 ‘domains’ to prompt members of the workforce (at every level) to reflect on their practice and opportunities for improvement. When we initially consulted, the reflective question sections were well received by the various sectors; people told us they were a practical tool to lift capability.

Send us your feedback

We’re now consulting more widely on the draft framework. To join the conversation, go to the consultation and ‘ask to join group.’

Workforce Capability Framework consultation(external link)

The consultation is open until 7 February, 2017. If you’d rather give your feedback or ask questions in confidence, you can email Family_Violence_Unit@msd.govt.nz.

As well as considering your feedback, we’ll use insights gained from working with Integrated Safety Response sites (see below) to inform the final version of the framework.

Paper focuses on positive change

The latest issues paper from the Family Violence Clearinghouse, ‘Responding to perpetrators of family violence,’ focuses on how New Zealand can achieve positive change with perpetrators of family violence.

One of the paper’s key findings is that integrated response systems are the best way to respond to family violence in New Zealand. According to researcher Devon Polaschek, the essential components of such systems include coordination between crisis response and immediate containment, criminal and civil court proceedings, sentences or order compliance, risk monitoring and behaviour change components, and providing services based on risk and need.

Polaschek argues these systems offer more opportunities to hold perpetrators to account and, in turn, will result in better outcomes for keeping victims safe. To read the full report see:

Responding to perpetrators of family violence(external link)

New campaign highlights danger signs

A new 'It's not OK' campaign launched this month highlights the signs that a woman is in danger of being killed by her partner or ex-partner.

This project was developed in response to a request from the NZ Death Review Committee to increase New Zealanders’ knowledge of coercive control and the lethality indicators. These danger signs are often missed by friends and family who don’t realise the behaviour they’re seeing is serious.

New resources (including ‘Know the danger signs’ posters and brochures) are available via a dedicated section on the It’s not OK website. You can also view videos featuring real people who lost a loved one because of family violence on the It’s not OK YouTube channel.

Through this project it’s hoped that more New Zealanders will know the danger signs, know they’re serious and take action to protect people in danger.

It’s not OK website(external link)

It’s not OK You Tube channel(external link)

Enrol now for postgraduate violence prevention course

Enrolments are now open for the University of Auckland’s Postgraduate Violence Prevention Studies 2017. The course is designed for practitioners, health promoters, researchers, policy analysts and managers to increase knowledge and understanding of intimate partner violence, child abuse and neglect, and other forms of family and whānau violence.

For more information about the course, see:

Postgraduate Violence Studies 2017 [PDF, 87KB](external link)

Stay informed

Family and Sexual Violence Work programme updates

If you know anyone who might like to subscribe to these updates, they can email familyandsexualviolene@justice.govt.nz.

Integrated Safety Response (ISR) pilot - newsletter

The ISR is a key initiative under the work programme and ISR team produces a regular newsletter. See the December 2016 issue:

ISR newsletter December 2016(external link)

Sexual violence service development update

Several key initiatives in the work programme are focused on reducing sexual violence and better supporting victims. The team working on these initiatives also produces a regular update. If you want to subscribe, or have any questions or feedback on these projects, please email CI_Sexual_Violence_Services@msd.govt.nz.

Contact us

If you have any questions about the work programme or this newsletter, please email us at familyandsexualviolence@justice.govt.nz

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17 May 2018 - Family and sexual violence work programme - Budget Special

Nau mai, haere mai.

Welcome to this special Budget edition of the e-Update from the Multi-Agency Team on Family and Sexual Violence. The Multi-Agency Team is leading government efforts to create a coordinated, cross-government approach to preventing and responding to family and sexual violence.

Dedicated body to lead and coordinate family and sexual violence system

The Government has announced funding for a dedicated body to lead the transformation of the family and sexual violence system.

Budget 2018 invests $2m in the establishment of the body, which will provide a single point of leadership and accountability for the whole-of-government response to family and sexual violence. It is responsible for improving the way in which Government agencies work together to reduce family violence and sexual violence, and how they engage meaningfully with service providers and the wider sector.

Jan Logie MP, the Parliamentary Under-Secretary to the Minister of Justice (Domestic and Sexual Violence), said, “An effective family and sexual violence system requires sustained leadership and coordination. It’s clear the current system is failing to prevent violence or provide the integrated responses people need. That’s why we’re creating a dedicated body to transform and lead the system.”

The body will set a clear direction for the Government’s commitment to prevent and reduce family and sexual violence, with a collective strategy designed in partnership with the sector, Māori and other stakeholders. The body will identify gaps in the system, inform the allocation of family and sexual violence investment across agencies, facilitate solutions by Māori, for Māori, and lead the system transformation needed so that we can reduce family and sexual violence.

The form this body will take will be confirmed in due course, but this initiative is consistent with recommendations made by recent reviews, including the Family Violence Death Review Committee, the Law Commission, the Productivity Commission, and the People’s Blueprint.

Significant funding boost for family violence services

In pre-Budget announcements, the Government announced an additional $76m(external link) over four years in Budget 2018 for front line social services working directly with families impacted by family violence.

Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni, said, “The 30 percent increase in funding is critical to the Government’s efforts to begin to turn around New Zealand’s tragic family violence record. Additional funding in 2019/20 will enable these critical front line agencies to expand into areas where there isn’t currently any support or start addressing over demand in existing services. This funding will provide a boost to around 150 providers of family violence services nationwide.”

Through Budget 2018, the Government is allocating an additional $76.157 million over four years to support the delivery of Ministry of Social Development-funded family violence services for victims, perpetrators and their families.

Jan Logie MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary to the Minister of Justice, said, “As we get started on the broader work of challenging and responding to family and sexual violence, it’s crucial that victims and their families are able to get the support they need now. Because they can’t wait.”

Minister for Children Tracey Martin said Budget 2018 funding would have an impact right across New Zealand.

“The announcement delivers on the Coalition Agreement between Labour and New Zealand First to increase funding in this area,” Tracey Martin said.

Whānau Protect – Safety at Home receives additional funding

Whānau Protect, a service which helps high-risk victims of family violence who want to leave violence behind, will receive more than $7.5m over the next four years(external link) in Budget 2018.

The funding will ensure the continuation of a service that reduces future victimisation and minimises social disruption by allowing victims to safely remain in their own homes.  Whānau Protect provides increased security features, such as monitored alarms. This initiative has been operating since 2008 in pilot locations (Christchurch, Tauranga and Auckland). It was expanded from June 2015 and achieved full nationwide delivery in March 2016, supporting around 400 high-risk victims each year.

Much-needed support for sexual abuse survivors

Survivors of sexual abuse will receive much-needed support with increased funding for sexual abuse assessment and treatment services(external link) in Budget 2018.

Sexual abuse and treatment services will receive $7.5 million over four years to provide help that is desperately needed by many New Zealanders. These services deliver acute and non-acute medical treatment, forensic services and referrals, which are important in helping prevent long-term effects such as ongoing distress and compromised wellbeing.

The Minister of ACC, Hon Iain Lees-Galloway said, “ACC works to reduce sexual assault in New Zealand and Budget 2018 has increased funding to services that work to prevent sexual abuse, and support victims through treatment.”

Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Justice Jan Logie, who has the first dedicated role in the Executive focused on family and sexual violence in New Zealand’s history said, “This Government is committed to ensuring people are supported and violence is prevented. Our plan includes properly resourcing sexual abuse assessment and treatment services, so I’m pleased that these crucial services are receiving the first significant funding increase from central government since 2008. It has been long overdue.”

Increased funding for Victim Support Services

Victim Support Services will get more than $13.5m extra over four years(external link) to ensure victims of crime and trauma have access to crisis response and long-term social support services. There will also be some financial assistance to help people with costs associated with being a victim of crime.

Through this newsletter you will receive updates on current work, including the implementation of the Family and Whānau Violence Legislation Bill(external link). We welcome your feedback so please email us at familyandsexualviolence@justice.govt.nz.

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